Sermon: Genesis 24: A Blessed Bride For Isaac

Old Testament Reading: Genesis 24

“Now Abraham was old, well advanced in years. And the LORD had blessed Abraham in all things. And Abraham said to his servant, the oldest of his household, who had charge of all that he had, ‘Put your hand under my thigh, that I may make you swear by the LORD, the God of heaven and God of the earth, that you will not take a wife for my son from the daughters of the Canaanites, among whom I dwell, but will go to my country and to my kindred, and take a wife for my son Isaac.’ The servant said to him, ‘Perhaps the woman may not be willing to follow me to this land. Must I then take your son back to the land from which you came?’ Abraham said to him, ‘See to it that you do not take my son back there. The LORD, the God of heaven, who took me from my father’s house and from the land of my kindred, and who spoke to me and swore to me, ‘To your offspring I will give this land,’ he will send his angel before you, and you shall take a wife for my son from there. But if the woman is not willing to follow you, then you will be free from this oath of mine; only you must not take my son back there.’ So the servant put his hand under the thigh of Abraham his master and swore to him concerning this matter. Then the servant took ten of his master’s camels and departed, taking all sorts of choice gifts from his master; and he arose and went to Mesopotamia to the city of Nahor. And he made the camels kneel down outside the city by the well of water at the time of evening, the time when women go out to draw water. And he said, ‘O LORD, God of my master Abraham, please grant me success today and show steadfast love to my master Abraham. Behold, I am standing by the spring of water, and the daughters of the men of the city are coming out to draw water. Let the young woman to whom I shall say, ‘Please let down your jar that I may drink,’ and who shall say, ‘Drink, and I will water your camels’—let her be the one whom you have appointed for your servant Isaac. By this I shall know that you have shown steadfast love to my master.’ Before he had finished speaking, behold, Rebekah, who was born to Bethuel the son of Milcah, the wife of Nahor, Abraham’s brother, came out with her water jar on her shoulder. The young woman was very attractive in appearance, a maiden whom no man had known. She went down to the spring and filled her jar and came up. Then the servant ran to meet her and said, ‘Please give me a little water to drink from your jar.’ She said, ‘Drink, my lord.’ And she quickly let down her jar upon her hand and gave him a drink. When she had finished giving him a drink, she said, ‘I will draw water for your camels also, until they have finished drinking.’ So she quickly emptied her jar into the trough and ran again to the well to draw water, and she drew for all his camels. The man gazed at her in silence to learn whether the LORD had prospered his journey or not. When the camels had finished drinking, the man took a gold ring weighing a half shekel, and two bracelets for her arms weighing ten gold shekels, and said, ‘Please tell me whose daughter you are. Is there room in your father’s house for us to spend the night?’ She said to him, ‘I am the daughter of Bethuel the son of Milcah, whom she bore to Nahor.’ She added, ‘We have plenty of both straw and fodder, and room to spend the night.’ The man bowed his head and worshiped the LORD and said, ‘Blessed be the LORD, the God of my master Abraham, who has not forsaken his steadfast love and his faithfulness toward my master. As for me, the LORD has led me in the way to the house of my master’s kinsmen.’ Then the young woman ran and told her mother’s household about these things. Rebekah had a brother whose name was Laban. Laban ran out toward the man, to the spring. As soon as he saw the ring and the bracelets on his sister’s arms, and heard the words of Rebekah his sister, ‘Thus the man spoke to me,’ he went to the man. And behold, he was standing by the camels at the spring. He said, ‘Come in, O blessed of the LORD. Why do you stand outside? For I have prepared the house and a place for the camels.’ So the man came to the house and unharnessed the camels, and gave straw and fodder to the camels, and there was water to wash his feet and the feet of the men who were with him. Then food was set before him to eat. But he said, ‘I will not eat until I have said what I have to say.’ He said, ‘Speak on.’ So he said, ‘I am Abraham’s servant. The LORD has greatly blessed my master, and he has become great. He has given him flocks and herds, silver and gold, male servants and female servants, camels and donkeys. And Sarah my master’s wife bore a son to my master when she was old, and to him he has given all that he has. My master made me swear, saying, ‘You shall not take a wife for my son from the daughters of the Canaanites, in whose land I dwell, but you shall go to my father’s house and to my clan and take a wife for my son.’ I said to my master, ‘Perhaps the woman will not follow me.’ But he said to me, ‘The LORD, before whom I have walked, will send his angel with you and prosper your way. You shall take a wife for my son from my clan and from my father’s house. Then you will be free from my oath, when you come to my clan. And if they will not give her to you, you will be free from my oath.’ I came today to the spring and said, ‘O LORD, the God of my master Abraham, if now you are prospering the way that I go, behold, I am standing by the spring of water. Let the virgin who comes out to draw water, to whom I shall say, ‘Please give me a little water from your jar to drink,’ and who will say to me, ‘Drink, and I will draw for your camels also,’ let her be the woman whom the LORD has appointed for my master’s son.’ Before I had finished speaking in my heart, behold, Rebekah came out with her water jar on her shoulder, and she went down to the spring and drew water. I said to her, ‘Please let me drink.’ She quickly let down her jar from her shoulder and said, ‘Drink, and I will give your camels drink also.’ So I drank, and she gave the camels drink also. Then I asked her, ‘Whose daughter are you?’ She said, ‘The daughter of Bethuel, Nahor’s son, whom Milcah bore to him.’ So I put the ring on her nose and the bracelets on her arms. Then I bowed my head and worshiped the LORD and blessed the LORD, the God of my master Abraham, who had led me by the right way to take the daughter of my master’s kinsman for his son. Now then, if you are going to show steadfast love and faithfulness to my master, tell me; and if not, tell me, that I may turn to the right hand or to the left.’ Then Laban and Bethuel answered and said, ‘The thing has come from the LORD; we cannot speak to you bad or good. Behold, Rebekah is before you; take her and go, and let her be the wife of your master’s son, as the LORD has spoken.’ When Abraham’s servant heard their words, he bowed himself to the earth before the LORD. And the servant brought out jewelry of silver and of gold, and garments, and gave them to Rebekah. He also gave to her brother and to her mother costly ornaments. And he and the men who were with him ate and drank, and they spent the night there. When they arose in the morning, he said, ‘Send me away to my master.’ Her brother and her mother said, ‘Let the young woman remain with us a while, at least ten days; after that she may go.’ But he said to them, ‘Do not delay me, since the LORD has prospered my way. Send me away that I may go to my master.’ They said, ‘Let us call the young woman and ask her.’ And they called Rebekah and said to her, ‘Will you go with this man?’ She said, ‘I will go.’ So they sent away Rebekah their sister and her nurse, and Abraham’s servant and his men. And they blessed Rebekah and said to her, ‘Our sister, may you become thousands of ten thousands, and may your offspring possess the gate of those who hate him!’ Then Rebekah and her young women arose and rode on the camels and followed the man. Thus the servant took Rebekah and went his way. Now Isaac had returned from Beer-lahai-roi and was dwelling in the Negeb. And Isaac went out to meditate in the field toward evening. And he lifted up his eyes and saw, and behold, there were camels coming. And Rebekah lifted up her eyes, and when she saw Isaac, she dismounted from the camel and said to the servant, ‘Who is that man, walking in the field to meet us?’ The servant said, ‘It is my master.’ So she took her veil and covered herself. And the servant told Isaac all the things that he had done. Then Isaac brought her into the tent of Sarah his mother and took Rebekah, and she became his wife, and he loved her. So Isaac was comforted after his mother’s death.” (Genesis 24, ESV)

*****

Introduction

The story of the marriage of Isaac and Rebekah is one of the most beloved stories in the book of Genesis. It is a very happy story. Some might even call it “romantic”.  And it is not uncommon for pastors — particularly youth pastors — to interpret this story as if it’s purpose was to provide guidelines for finding spouse. 

Friends, though it be true that there is something romantic about this story, its purpose is not to show us how to find a spouse. Instead, its purpose is to once again highlight the LORD’s provision and his faithfulness to fulfill the promises he made to Abraham. The LORD promised that Abraham would have many descendents. Nations and kings would come from him. Specifically, the promises would be fulfilled through Isaac, the son of promise. And now that Abraham is advanced in years he is concerned to find a wife for Isaac, not only that Isaac might be comforted by her, but also that he would bear children by her, thus fulfilling the promises of God concerning a multitude of descendents. Now, I do not deny that there are some interesting observations to make along the way that pertain to finding a godly spouse (and I will make some of those observations). But those observations are tangential to the main point, namely, the fulfillment of the promises of God made to Abraham through Isaac and his blessed wife, Rebekah.  

This passage is a little difficult to preach for two reasons. One, it is long. And two, it is a bit repetitive. I have decided to preach the passage by saying a brief word about each of main characters. One, we will consider Abraham and his diligence. Two, we will consider Abraham’s servant and his obedience. Three, we will consider Laban and his greed. Four, we will consider Rebekah and her faith. And five, we will consider Isaac and his comfort. 

*****

Abraham’s Diligence

Let us begin with Abraham and take special notice of his diligence. 

Abraham, being now very advanced in years, was diligent to find a bride for his son Isaac. It should not be difficult to understand that the fulfillment of the promises of God concerning a great multitude descending from Abraham would require that Isaac be married and have children. And so Abraham was diligent to commission his faithful servant to go and find a bride for his son.

APPLICATION: Brothers and sisters, as you consider this narrative I hope you are able to recognize that trusting in the promises of God does not mean that we are sit idly by waiting for their fulfillment. It would have been irresponsible for Abraham to sit around waiting for a bride for Isaac to magically appear.  Based upon the promises of God made to Abraham, Isaac would surely marry and have children — this would certainly come to pass! But do you see that it was right  for Abraham to take the initiative to send his servant to find a bride for him? This was Abraham’s responsibility.   

Throughout the pages of Holy Scripture we see that God is sovereign over all things, and yet human beings are responsible. These two things — God’s sovereignty and man’s responsibility —  do not contradict one another. Instead they fit together hand in hand. 

God is sovereign. He has  decreed from eternity past all things that shall come to pass. And he also providentially rules over his creation. He will  carry out his decrees. But please understand, God’s sovereignty does not do away with the free choices of human beings, nor does it remove our responsibility. Instead, what we see in the scriptures from beginning to end is that God, who is sovereign over all, will indeed bring about all of his purposes, and this he will do through the free choices of responsible creatures. 

I will admit, it is mysterious to me as to how exactly God’s sovereignty and man’s responsibility fit together. But one thing I know for sure is that this is what the scriptures teach. God is sovereign over all. Nothing is outside of his control. He will surely do that which he has decreed. And yet you and I are responsible creatures who make  real choices. 

Perhaps no single verse demonstrates this better than Acts 2:23. There Peter is found preaching to the Jews on the day of Pentecost, saying,  “Men of Israel, hear these words: Jesus of Nazareth, a man attested to you by God with mighty works and wonders and signs that God did through him in your midst, as you yourselves know— this Jesus, delivered up according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of lawless men.” (Acts 2:22–23, ESV). In verse 23 we learn that Christ was crucified because it was the definite plan of God, and yet at the same time Peter sets the blame at the feet of those who freely chose to crucify him. You can complain all you want concerning the mystery, but one thing you cannot do is deny that the scriptures teach it. God is sovereign over all (event the crucifixion of Christ), and yet man is a responsible creature. 

Abraham knew this. When he considered the promises of God he knew for certain that Isaac would  have a wife and kids someday. And yet Abraham also knew that he was responsible to act, for God brings his purposes about through the free choices  of his creatures. 

Remember how Abraham got into trouble earlier in his life when he convinced his wife to lie, saying only that  she was his sister, and by going along with Sarah’s plan to have a child by way of Hagar? In those instances we criticized Abraham for his lack of faith. There we said that Abraham should have waited upon the LORD instead of taking matters into his own hands. But note this: Abraham failed in those instances, not because he took action, but because he acted contrary to the law of God and without faith. In those instances his activity was fleshly and faithless. But please do not misunderstand. This does not mean that we are to sit idly by waiting for God to magically fulfill his promises. The Christian life is to be characterized by activity — diligent and faithful activity. The Christian is to be active, knowing that God will accomplish his decrees through the actives of his free creatures.

Has God promised to sanctify you if you are in Christ Jesus? Indeed, he has promised to refine those who belong to  to him. But notice that we are also exhorted in the scriptures pursue holiness. Hebrews 12:14 says, “Strive for… holiness without which no one will see the Lord” (Hebrews 12:14, ESV). See, therefore, that God has promised to make us holy, and yet we are responsible to strive after holiness.

Similarly, has God promised to preserve you if you are in Christ Jesus? Indeed he has! “And I am sure of this”,  Paul wrote, “that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ” (Philippians 1:6, ESV). And yet we are also responsible to persevere. The writers to the Hebrews offers these words of warning: “Take care, brothers, lest there be in any of you an evil, unbelieving heart, leading you to fall away from the living God” (Hebrews 3:12, ESV).

God is sovereign. He will bring about his purposes. He will fulfill everyone of his promises. And yet this he will do, not in competition with, but through the free choices of his responsible creatures. Brothers and sisters, trust in God, but also take action. Pray that the Lord would provide for you and your family, but also go to work. Ask the Lord to give you victory over sin, but also choose not to sin. Rest assured that the Lord will preserve you if you are his in Christ  Jesus, but never grow slack. You must persevere to the end in Christ, knowing that there is no salvation outside of him. 

Abraham was diligent to find a wife for Isaac. He took action, not because he lacked faith, but because he knew that the fulfillment of God’s promises would come about through his faithful activities. Abraham walked by faith and not by sight. But here I am emphasizing that the walk of faith does involve walking.

Not only was Abraham diligent to send his servant off on this mission, he was also diligent to give him specific instructions. He made his trusted servant “swear by the LORD, the God of heaven and God of the earth, that [he] will not take a wife for [his] son from the daughters of the Canaanites, among whom [Abraham  dwelt], but [would] go to [his] country and to [his] kindred, and [there] take a wife for… Isaac” (Genesis 24:3–4, ESV).

Certainly, it would have been easier to take a wife from amongst the Canaanites. I’m sure there were many eligible young ladies living in close proximity to Abraham’s clan. Not to mention that Abraham could have bettered his position in the land by making an alliance via marriage, as was the custom in his day. But Abraham insisted that a bride be taken for his son, not from amongst the Canaanites, but from amongst his own people back in Mesopotamia. 

Calvin states that the reason for this is that, “he would not allow his own race to be mingled with that of the Canaanites, whom he knew to be already divinely appointed to destruction; yea, since upon their overthrow he was to be put into possession of the land…” (Commentary on the First Book of Moses Called). 

The Abrahamic Covenant was a fleshly, earthly covenant. Abraham was concerned  to preserve  the purity of the covenant by taking a wife for his son from amongst his own people, and not the Canaanites.  There is, of course, a New Covenant paralel to this. The New Covenant is not confined to a particular race of men.  Indeed, all who have faith in Christ, Jew or Gentile, are partakers of the blessings of the New Covenant. Christians are therefore free to marry all kinds of people — ethnicity is no barrier to marriage — but the Christian is to marry in the Lord. Marrying someone of a different race will have no impact upon the purity  of the New Covenant, for it is not fleshly and earthly, but spiritual. What matters is faith in Christ. Brothers and sisters, if you hope to marry in the future, be resolved marry in the Lord. Be sure that the person has faith — true faith — in  Christ Jesus. Marriage is a blessing . But a bad marriage can make a real mess of things. Marry in the Lord.

Notice also that Abraham instated that his servant not take Isaac out of the land of  promise. The servants question was a reasonable one. “The servant said to him, ‘Perhaps the woman may not be willing to follow me to this land. Must I then take your son back to the land from which you came?” (Genesis 24:5, ESV). Abrahams reply: “See to it that you do not take my son back there. The LORD, the God of heaven, who took me from my father’s house and from the land of my kindred, and who spoke to me and swore to me, ‘To your offspring I will give this land,’ he will send his angel before you, and you shall take a wife for my son from there. But if the woman is not willing to follow you, then you will be free from this oath of mine; only you must not take my son back there” (Genesis 24:6–8, ESV). This proves what I said earlier, that this entire episode is about the fulfillment of God’s promises to Abraham. Abraham was to have many descendents, and these descendents were to possess the land of the Canaanites. 

Abraham’s faith is impressive here. He took action — that has already been emphasized. But he did not cut corners. He refused to take the easy rout. Sure, it would have been easier to find a wife for Isaac from amongst the Canaanites, but he was not willing to corrupt the covenant. And it would have been more reasonable to take Isaac back to the homeland to meet the potential bride, but Abraham would not risk the abandonment of the land of promise. 

APPLICATION:  Brothers and sisters, following Christ in this world often requires this kind of resolve. No, I won’t take the job for it will  require me to work on the Lord’s Day. I’ll keep looking for another trusting that the Lord will provide and I will worship according to his word. Or, no, I will not marry this girl. She is wonderful in every way, but she she does not have faith. I will trust that the Lord will provide another. These are not easy decisions, friends. But following after Christ in this world requires this kind of resolve. The straight and narrow road is sometimes a difficult one to travel. 

*****

His Servant’s Obedience

Secondly, I would like to say a brief word about Abraham’s servant’s obedience. This man is everything that a faithful servant should be. 

Notice that this servant does not have a name. Obviously he had a name, but we are not told what it was. But that should not matter to a servant. A servant’s desire is to do the will of his master and to promote his name. May the same be true of us as we serve Christ. May our highest aim be his glory, and not our own. 

Notice also how hesitant this servant was to take an oath that he did not understand or could not fulfill. He asked for clarification before placing his hand under Abraham’s thigh (we raise the right hand in our culture, or sign our name).  He also obtained an exception from Abraham before swearing. Abraham released him from the obligation, saying, “But if the woman is not willing to follow you, then you will be free from this oath of mine; only you must not take my son back there” (Genesis 24:8, ESV). Oh, that we would take our oaths this seriously. Our yes should be yes, and our no should be no. This 

This servant was very faithful to Abraham.  He traveled a great distance. And when he arrived he  would not rest or refresh himself with food and drink until he finished his masters work. May we be this devoted to our LORD and committed to his work. 

Notice that this servant also shared Abraham’s faith. He believed that the LORD would give him success. He prayed to the LORD saying,  “O LORD, God of my master Abraham, please grant me success today and show steadfast love to my master Abraham. Behold, I am standing by the spring of water, and the daughters of the men of the city are coming out to draw water. Let the young woman to whom I shall say, ‘Please let down your jar that I may drink,’ and who shall say, ‘Drink, and I will water your camels’—let her be the one whom you have appointed for your servant Isaac. By this I shall know that you have shown steadfast love to my master” (Genesis 24:12–14, ESV). And who the LORD gave him success, he bowed and worshipped “and said, ‘Blessed be the LORD, the God of my master Abraham, who has not forsaken his steadfast love and his faithfulness toward my master. As for me, the LORD has led me in the way to the house of my master’s kinsmen’” (Genesis 24:27, ESV). 

*****

Laban’s Greed   

Let us now briefly consider the character of Laban, the brother of Rebekah. 

Notice that he was quite impressed with the wealth of Abraham. The narrative emphasizes how he took note of the “ ring and the bracelets on his sister’s arms”. He also was found standing “by the camels at the spring” (Genesis 24:30, ESV). Put into todays terms, he was found checking out the servant’s Cadillac Escalades. Not much is said about Laban, but he is portrayed as one impressed with the wealth of Abraham, and desiring to profit from it. 

APPLICATION: Friends, we must be careful to not allow the glitter of wealth to catch our eye and to captivate our affections. To be rich is not sinful. Abraham was very wealthy because the Lord chose to bless him in that way. But to love money is sinful. Listen carefully: “The love of money is a root of all kinds of evils. It is through this craving that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pangs” (1 Timothy 6:10, ESV). Brothers  and sisters, there are some who are rich who love money supremely, and there are some who are rich who love the LORD supremely. Similarly, there are some who are poor who love money supremely, and there are some who are poor who love the LORD supremely. No matter our financial position, let us be careful to never be entangled by the love of money. 

*****

Rebekah’s Faith  

Now we come to the real star of the story — Rebekah. As we consider Rebekah, we are to notice her faith. 

Remember that Rebekah was mentioned for the first time back at the end of Genesis 22 in that little genealogy of Nahor, the brother of Abraham. On of the reasons for that genealogy was to set the stage for the introduction of Rebekah into the narrative. 

You should know that her name sounds like the word “to bless” in the Hebrew language. You and I might miss it, but she is portrayed as one who, like Abraham, is blessed of the LORD. 

Notice that she was hard working and hospitable. Abraham and Lot have already demonstrated that they were a hospitable people, concerned for the wellbeing of the sojourner. And what did Rebekah do for Abraham’s servant as he sojourned? She gave him a drink of water when he was weary. More than that, she watered all of his camels. That was a huge job! The young woman was not afraid of hard work. Her natural bent towards hospitality made her a perfect candidate as a wife for Isaac, the son of Abraham, the father of a hospitable people.   

In fact, Rebekah met all of the qualifications. She was a girl of marrying age who had not joined herself to a man. She was from Abraham’s clan. She was hard working and hospitable. On top of all of this, she was of beautiful appearance. Add to this the fact that Abraham’s servant had just prayed to the LORD, saying, “Let the young woman to whom I shall say, ‘Please let down your jar that I may drink,’ and who shall say, ‘Drink, and I will water your camels’—let her be the one whom you have appointed for your servant Isaac. By this I shall know that you have shown steadfast love to my master’” (Genesis 24:14, ESV). All things considered, Rebekah seemed to be the one. It appeared that the LORD had directed the servant to her providentially. 

APPLICATION: Brothers and sisters, you and I don’t know what the will of the LORD is. And by that I mean, we do not know his hidden or secret will is for the future. His future providence is mysterious to us. But in another sense we do know what the will of the LORD is. Here I am referring to God’s revealed will. Friends, we cannot get hung up on the fact that we do not know the secret will of God. Instead we must rise up day by day and obey his revealed will — his law; his word — and trust that he will providentially guide us according to his secret will. You know the song. Trust and obey, for there is no other way, to be happy in Jesus, than to trust and obey. That’s what Abraham’s servant did, and the LORD led him to the blessed Rebekah.  

But one question remained. Would she be willing to go?

Notice that the choice was hers to make. She was not forced into this. After Abraham’s servant told the story of God’s provision for him, “Laban and Bethuel answered and said, ‘The thing has come from the LORD; we cannot speak to you bad or good’ (Genesis 24:50, ESV). And when it was time to leave, “They said, ‘Let us call the young woman and ask her.’ And they called Rebekah and said to her, ‘Will you go with this man?’ She said, ‘I will go’” (Genesis 24:57–58, ESV).

Take special note of this — Rebekah is the female version of Abraham. She, like him, was  called to leave her home to go to a land of promise. And she, like him, exercised great faith when she decided to go.  Think of how scary that must have been for her to leave her home at such a young age, and to go with a group of men that she had never met before. That required great faith. Now granted, it was not leap into the dark. She knew of her relative Abraham. Proof of his wealth had been provided to her. Nevertheless, she had great faith. 

Listen to the blessing pronounced upon her and compare it to the promises of God made to Abraham and Isaac. “And they blessed Rebekah and said to her, ‘Our sister, may you become thousands of ten thousands, and may your offspring possess the gate of those who hate him!’” (Genesis 24:60, ESV).Clearly, the purpose of this story is to show that it would be through Isaac and Rebekah that the promises made to Abraham would be fulfilled.

*****

Isaac’s Comfort   

Lastly, let us consider very briefly that Isaac was comforted by Rebekah as he mourned the death of his  mother. 

The most romantic portion of this story begins in verse 62. “Now Isaac had returned from Beer-lahai-roi and was dwelling in the Negeb. And Isaac went out to meditate in the field toward evening. And he lifted up his eyes and saw, and behold, there were camels coming. And Rebekah lifted up her eyes, and when she saw Isaac, she dismounted from the camel and said to the servant, ‘Who is that man, walking in the field to meet us?’ The servant said, ‘It is my master.’ So she took her veil and covered herself. And the servant told Isaac all the things that he had done” (Genesis 24:62–66, ESV).

Isaac was 40 years old when he married Rebekah. This we learn in 25:20. But isn’t it interesting that Isaac’s comfort is emphasized in this story that is clearly about the fulfillment of the promises made to Abraham. 

APPLICATION: Friends, God is sovereign over all. He is God Almighty. He will accomplish all of his purposes. But do you see that he is also a compassionate Father. Not only was he concerned to fulfill his purposes through Isaac. He was also concerned for Isaac. And he is also concerned for you. Yes, the  LORD is accomplishing things that are way bigger than you. Yes, he is concerned about big things that make the little circumstances of your life seem small by comparison. But our God is so big and awesome that he also able to be near to us and to be concerned about our little problems. He is concerned to bring comfort to his people who have been redeemed by the blood of the lamb. Put into theological terms, our God is both transcendent and immanent.  He is God Most High, Creator of heaven and  earth, and he is YHWH, the covenant making and keeping God, who is can ever present help in time   of need. 

*****

Conclusion 

Brothers and sisters, as we move now to the conclusion, please recognize that the point of this sermon is that God was faithful to fulfill his promises. He faithful to provide a blessed bride for Isaac so that the promises made to Abraham would be fulfilled. More than that, please know that the Lord has been faithful to provide a Savior who arose, in  the fulness of time, arose from the  line of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob — Jesus Christ our Lord. Let us be found  ever trusting in him, for apart from him there is no forgiveness of sins.

Comments are closed.


"Him we proclaim,
warning everyone and teaching everyone with all wisdom,
that we may present everyone mature in Christ."
(Colossians 1:28, ESV)

© 2011-2020 Emmaus Reformed Baptist Church